Shop

/Shop
  • Pomeranian

    Rated 4.00 out of 5

    Description

    Descended from large sled dog breeds, the now-tiny Pomeranian has a long and interesting history. The foxy-faced dog, nicknamed “the little dog who thinks he can,” is compact, active, and capable of competing in agility and obedience or simply being a family friend.

    Vital Stats:

    Dog Breed Group: Companion Dogs Height: 7 inches to 1 foot tall at the shoulder Weight: 3 to 7 pounds Life Span: 12 to 16 years

    Highlights

    • Pomeranians often are suspicious of strangers and can bark a lot.
    • Pomeranians can be difficult to housetrain. Crate training is recommended.
    • High heat and humidity can cause your Pom to become overheated and possibly have heat stroke. When your Pom is outdoors, watch him carefully for signs of overheating and take him inside immediately. They definitely are housedogs and should not be kept outdoors.
    • While Poms are good with children, they are not a good choice for very young or highly active children because of their small size. Never let your small children and your Pom play without supervision.
    • Because they are so small, Poms can be perceived as prey by owls, eagles, hawks, coyotes, and other wild animals. Never leave them outside unattended, and be watchful if there are predatory birds in your location. If this is the case, stay close to your Pom to discourage birds from trying to carry them off!
    • Because they are small and attractive, Poms are targets for dognappers, another reason why you shouldn't leave them outside unattended, even in a fenced yard.
    • Although they are small, Poms don't seem to realize it and can have a "big dog" attitude. This can spell disaster if they decide to chase a bigger dog that they think is encroaching upon their territory, or if they jump from a high place. It's up to you to make sure that your little one doesn't harm himself due to not realizing his limitations.
    • When your Pom gets old, he may develop bald spots in his beautiful coat.
    • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
       
  • Dachshund

    Rated 3.00 out of 5
    Dachshunds are scent hound dog breeds who were bred to hunt badgers and other tunneling animals, rabbits, and foxes. Packs of Dachshunds were even used to trail wild boar. Today their versatility makes them excellent family companions, show dogs, and small-game hunters.

    Vital Stats:

    Dog Breed Group:Hound Dogs Height:8 inches to 9 inches tall at the shoulder Weight:16 to 32 pounds Life Span:12 to 15 years

    Highlights

    • Dachshunds can be stubborn and difficult to housebreak. Crate-training is recommended.
    • Dachshunds are intelligent dogs with an independent nature and playful spirit. Because of this, they can be mischievous. Be patient, firm, and consistent when training them.
    • Because they were bred for hunting, they can exhibit some behaviors that are related to that. They were designed to dig into badger burrows, and that instinct may lead them to dig up your dahlias instead. They were bred to be tenacious in the hunt, and this instinct may lead them to be relentless in pestering you for a treat. They were bred to not only hunt but kill their prey; in your household, the "prey" most likely will be your Dachshund's toys and he will effectively "kill" them one after the other.
    • Dachshunds have loud, deep barks for a dog their size - and they do like to bark!
    • If you don't watch out, your Dachshund can become fat and lazy, which will put more strain on his fragile back. Be sure to monitor your Dachshund's food intake and keep him at a healthy weight.
    • Dachshunds are prone to having slipped disks in their backs, which can lead to partial or full paralysis. Don't let them jump from high places, and when you hold them, support their backs.
    • Your Dachshund will probably be a one-person dog. By nature, he can be suspicious of strangers, so it's important to socialize him when he is a puppy.
    • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store.
     
  • Pug

    Rated 4.20 out of 5

    Description

    Pugs often are described as a lot of dog in a small space. These sturdy, compact dogs are a part of the American Kennel Club’s Toy group, and are known as the clowns of the canine world because they have a great sense of humor and like to show off. Originally bred to be a lap dog, the Pug thrives on human companionship.

    Vital Stats:

    Dog Breed Group:Companion Dogs Height:10 inches to 1 foot, 2 inches tall at the shoulder Weight:14 to 18 pounds Life Span:12 to 15 years

    Highlights

    • Pugs can be stubborn and difficult to housebreak. Crate training is recommended.
    • Pugs can't tolerate high heat and humidity because of a short muzzle (air cools down when it passes through the noses of dogs with longer muzzles before entering the lungs). When your Pug is outdoors, watch him carefully for signs of overheating. Pugs are definitely housedogs and should not be kept outdoors.
    • Despite their short coats, Pugs shed a lot.
    • Pugs wheeze, snort and snore, loudly.
    • Because their eyes are so prominent, Pugs are prone to eye injuries.
    • Pugs are greedy eaters and will overeat if given the chance. Since they gain weight easily, they can quickly become obese if food intake isn't monitored carefully.
    • Pugs need human constant human companion. If you own a Pug, expect him to follow you around in the house, sit in your lap, and want to sleep in bed with you.
    • Pug enthusiasts are a fun-loving bunch. They love Pug get-togethers, Pug parades, and dressing up their Pugs.
    • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
  • Chow Chow

    Rated 4.33 out of 5

    Description

    This distinctive-looking dog breed has a proud, independent spirit that some describe as catlike. He can be aloof — if you’re looking for a cuddle buddy, this probably isn’t the best breed for you — and downright suspicious of strangers. But for the right person, he’s a fiercely loyal companion.

    Vital Stats:

    Dog Breed Group: Working Dogs Height: 1 foot, 5 inches to 1 foot, 8 inches tall at the shoulder Weight: 40 to 70 pounds Life Span: 12 to 15 years

    Highlights

    Chow Chows are very independent and aloof, and they need an owner who appreciates those traits but won't let the dog take over. Chows should be well socialized — introduced to new people, dogs, and situations beginning in early puppyhood — to ensure that they're safe and relaxed as adults. Chow Chows may bond with just one person or to their immediate family. They're suspicious of strangers. Chows need to be brushed two or three times a week to keep their coat in good condition. Chows can live in apartments or condos, so long as they get daily exercise. Because of his deep-set eyes, the Chow Chow has limited peripheral vision; it's best to approach him from the front. To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from a puppy mill, a pet store, or a breeder who doesn't provide health clearances or guarantees. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies and who breeds for sound temperaments.
  • American Pit Bull Terrier

    Rated 4.38 out of 5

    Description

    The American Pit Bull Terrier is a companion and family dog breed. Originally bred to “bait” bulls, the breed evolved into all-around farm dogs, and later moved into the house to become “nanny dogs” because they were so gentle around children. Their tenacity, gameness, and courage make them popular competitors in the sports of weight pulling, agility, and obedience competition.

    Vital Stats:

    Dog Breed Group: Terrier Dogs Height: 1 foot, 5 inches to 1 foot, 7 inches tall at the shoulder Weight: 30 to 85 pounds Life Span: 12 to 16 years

    Highlights

     
    • American Pit Bull Terriers are not a good choice for people who can give them little or no attention.
    • They must be trained and socialized when young to overcome the breed's tendencies toward stubbornness and bossiness, which combined with his strength can make him hard to handle if he hasn't learned you are in charge.
    • Your American Pit Bull Terrier must be kept on leash in public to prevent aggression toward other dogs. It's not a good idea to let these dogs run loose in dog parks. While they might not start a fight, they'll never back down from one, and they fight to the finish. American Pit Bulls who aren't properly socialized as puppies can become aggressive toward other dogs.
    • Breed-specific legislation almost always includes this breed. Be aware of rules in your area as well as neighboring regions if you travel with your dog.
    • American Pit Bull Terriers have a great need to chew, and powerful jaws make quick work of cheap or flimsy toys. Give yours only tough, durable toys that can't be chewed up and swallowed.
    • American Pit Bull Terriers are best suited to owners who can offer firm, fair training, and gentle consistent discipline.
       
  • Bull Terrier

    Rated 5.00 out of 5

    Description

    The Bull Terrier was originally developed in the 19th century as a fighting dog and, later, a fashionable companion for gentlemen, but these days he’s a family companion and show dog. He’s a dog breed distinguished by his long, egg-shaped head.

    Vital Stats:

    Dog Breed Group:Terrier Dogs Height:1 foot, 9 inches to 1 foot, 10 inches tall at the shoulder Weight:35 to 75 pounds Life Span:10 to 15 years

    Highlights

    • Bull Terriers thrive in the company of their people, and should live indoors with their human family. They don't do well when left alone for long periods and will wreak destruction when bored.
    • Bull Terriers aren't suited for cold, damp climates. Keep your Bull Terrier warm with a coat or sweater in winter.
    • These aren't high maintenance dogs, grooming-wise. A weekly brushing and occasional wipe-down with a damp cloth is usually all it takes to keeps them clean, although they must be brushed more frequently during twice-yearly shedding periods.
    • The Bull Terrier needs 30 to 60 minutes of exercise, play, and mental stimulation daily.
    • Ownership of Bull Terriers is restricted or banned in some cities, states, and provinces. Research your local dog laws before you get one; banned dogs may be seized and euthanized.
    • The Bull Terrier is strong-willed and can be difficult to train. He's not recommended for timid or first-time dog owners.
    • Without early socialization and training, Bull Terriers can be aggressive toward other dogs, animals, and people he doesn't know.
    • Bull Terriers are too rough and rambunctious for homes with young children, but they're tireless playmates for active older kids who've been taught how to interact with dogs.
    • Never buy a Bull Terrier from a puppy mill, a pet store, or a breeder who doesn't provide health clearances or guarantees. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies and who breeds for sound temperaments.
  • Doberman Pinscher

    Rated 4.00 out of 5

    Description

    The Doberman Pinscher was developed in Germany during the late 19th century, primarily as a guard dog. His exact ancestry is unknown, but he’s believed to be a mixture of many dog breeds, including the Rottweiler, Black and Tan Terrier, and German Pinscher. With his sleek coat, athletic build, and characteristic cropped ears and docked tail, the Doberman Pinscher looks like an aristocrat. He is a highly energetic and intelligent dog, suited for police and military work, canine sports, and as a family guardian and companion.

    Vital Stats:

    Dog Breed Group:Working Dogs Height:2 feet to 2 feet, 4 inches tall at the shoulder Weight:60 to 80 pounds Life Span:10 to 13 years

    Highlights

    • The Doberman has a great deal of energy and needs a lot of exercise.
    • This breed can be protective, so don't be surprised when he assumes the role of household guardian.
    • The Dobie will assume the alpha role in your household if you're not a strong leader. Early, consistent training is critical to establish your role as pack leader.
    • The Dobie is sensitive to cold weather and needs adequate shelter in winter (he likes to be in the house next to the fireplace).
    • The Doberman Pinscher is a family dog and shouldn't be left alone. He thrives when he's included in family activities.
    • The Doberman has gained a reputation as being vicious. Even though your Doberman may have a sweet personality, neighbors and strangers may be afraid of him.
    • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
  • Rottweiler

    Rated 4.43 out of 5

    Description

    Rottweilers were originally dogs bred to drive cattle to market. Later they were used to pull carts for butchers. They were among the earliest police dogs and serve with honor in the military. Most important, they are popular family guardians and friends.

    Vital Stats:

    Dog Breed Group:Working Dogs Height:1 foot, 10 inches to 2 feet, 3 inches tall at the shoulder Weight:85 to 130 pounds Life Span:8 to 11 years

    Highlights

    • Rottweilers are large, powerful dogs and require extensive socialization and training from early puppyhood.
    • Even if you train and socialize your Rottweiler, expect to be subjected to sometimes unfair advance judgments about your dog, maybe even having untrue allegations made about him and his activities, by those who fear him.
    • Because of the current prejudice against dogs such as Rottweilers and claims that they can be dangerous, you may have to carry extra liability insurance to own one, depending upon the ordinances in your town. In some areas, you may not even be able to own a Rottweiler, or may be forced to give up any that you have.
    • Rottweilers love people and want to be with their families. If they are left alone for long periods of time or don't receive adequate exercise, they may become destructive.
    • If raised with children, well-bred Rottweilers get along fine with them. They must be taught, however, what is acceptable behavior with children. Rotties have a natural instinct to herd and may "bump" children to herd them. Because of their size, this "bump" may cause toddlers to fall down and injure themselves. In addition, some Rottweilers have a strong prey drive and may get overly excited when children run and play. Always supervise your Rottweiler when he's around children.
    • If you have an adult Rottweiler, introduce new animals, especially dogs, carefully. Rottweilers can be aggressive toward strange dogs, particularly those of the same sex. Under your leadership, however, your Rottie will probably learn to coexist peacefully with his new companion.
    • Rottweilers are intelligent and are highly trainable if you're firm and consistent.
    • Rottweilers will test you to see if you really mean what you say. Be specific in what you ask, and don't leave any loopholes for them to exploit.
    • Rottweilers require a couple of 10- to 20-minute walks or playtimes daily.
    • Rottweilers have a double coat and shed heavily in the spring and the fall, moderately throughout the rest of the year.
    • Many Rottweilers snore.
    • If their food intake is not monitored, Rotties have a tendency to overeat and can gain weight.
    • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
  • Description

    The Akita is a large and powerful dog breed with a noble and intimidating presence. They were originally used for guarding royalty and nobility in feudal Japan. These dogs also tracked and hunted wild boar, black bear, and sometimes deer. The Akita does not back down from challenges and does not frighten easily. Consequently, they are fearless and loyal guardians of their families. Yet they are also affectionate, respectful, and amusing dogs when properly trained and socialized.

    Vital Stats:

    Dog Breed Group:Working Dogs Height:2 feet to 2 feet, 4 inches tall at the shoulder Weight:70 to 130 pounds Life Span:10 to 12 years

    Highlights

    To get a healthy pet, never buy a puppy from a irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Find a rescue or shelter that will vaccinate, provide veterinary care, and require applicants to meet dogs to make sure they are a good fit for their potential forever family.
    • The Akita can aggressive with other dogs and is especially prone to same-sex aggression. They'll need socialization training to overcome these tendencies.
    • The Akita is not a good choice for first-time dog owners.
    • Positive socialization and consistent, firm training are essential for the Akita. If he is mishandled or mistreated, they often respond by becoming aggressive.
    • The Akita will chase other pets in the house if not trained properly.
    • The Akita sheds—a lot!
    • Prolonged eye contact is considered a challenge by the Akita, and they may respond aggressively.
    • Training the willful Akita can be challenging and requires understanding, experience, and patience. It's best to work with a trainer familiar with the breed, but be sure to be involved in the training, yourself.
  • Description

    The Basset dog breed was bred for hunting small game such as rabbits and is still used for this purpose in some parts of the country. When he’s not on the trail of a bunny, he’s a laid-back family friend who loves kids.

    Vital Stats:

    Dog Breed Group:Hound Dogs Height:Up to 1 foot, 2 inches tall at the shoulder Weight:50 to 65 pounds Life Span:10 to 12 years

    Highlights

    • Like all hounds, Bassets can be stubborn and difficult to train and housetrain. Crate training is recommended.
    • If they catch an interesting scent, Basset Hounds may try to follow it, no matter how much danger it poses to them. Keep your Basset on leash when outside and not in a fenced yard. Also, take him to obedience class and be sure he responds well to the Come command. Use gentleness and patience to train him. Hounds of all types typically think for themselves and don't respond well to harsh training techniques.
    • One of the primary reasons that Basset Hounds are given up to rescue or for adoption is that they "drool too much." Because of the loose skin around their mouths, they also tend to make quite a mess when they drink. If you're a fastidious housekeeper who can't stand drool, a Basset Hound is not the best choice for you.
    • Basset Hounds often have flatulence. If this problem seems excessive, talk to your vet. A change in diet may help.
    • Obesity is a real problem for Basset Hounds. They love to eat and will overeat if given the chance. If they put on too much weight, they can begin to have joint and back problems. Portion out food relative to your Basset's condition, not by the recommendation on the bag or can.
    • Because Basset Hounds are prone to bloat (a potentially fatal condition), it's better to feed them two or three smaller meals a day rather than one large meal a day. Don't allow your Basset to exercise too strenuously after eating, and watch him for about an hour after eating to make sure he's okay.
    • Your Basset's long ears need to be checked and cleaned each week to help prevent ear infections. You may find that you need to wash the ear flaps even more often, because they can drag in puddles and pick up dirt as they drag the ground.
    • Basset Hounds can howl loudly, especially if they are left along for long periods of time.
    • Even though your Basset Hound is strong and amazingly agile for having such short legs, it's best to discourage him from jumping, for example, out of a car. Pick him up and support his back to ensure he doesn't get hurt.
    • Basset puppies can suffer from joint problems as they grow. Try not to allow your puppy to overdo things when he plays and discourage him from jumping on and off furniture.
    • With two-thirds of their body weight in the front of their bodies, Basset Hounds are not great swimmers. Don't allow your Basset Hound to fall into a swimming pool because he can quickly get into trouble.
    • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from a backyard breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
  • Description

    This old Italian dog breed was developed to guard property and hunt big game such as wild boar. He is powerful and athletic and is best suited to an experienced owner who has a large, securely fenced yard.

    Vital Stats:

    Dog Breed Group:Working Dogs Height:1 foot, 11 inches to 2 feet, 3 inches tall at the shoulder Weight:90 to 120 pounds Life Span:10 to 12 years

    Highlights

    • The Corso’s short coat comes in black, light, and dark shades of gray; light and dark shades of fawn; and red. Any of these colors may have a brindle pattern: irregular streaks of light and dark color.
    • Solid fawn and red Corsos may have a black or gray mask.
    • The Corso’s ears may be cropped or uncropped.
    • The Corso is a working dog who needs lots of mental and physical stimulation.
    • Corsos are not demonstrative, but they enjoy “talking” to their people with “woo woo woo” sounds, snorts, and other verbalizations.
    • The Corso is not a good “first dog.” He requires plenty of socialization, training, and exercise to be a good companion.
  • Description

    A dog breed who’s gentle and fearless, the Maltese greets everyone as a friend. His glamorous white coat gives him a look of haughty nobility, but looks can be deceiving. This is a sprightly, vigorous dog who excels not only as a companion but also as a therapy dog and competitor in such dog sports as agility, obedience, rally, and tracking. But most of all, he loves to be with his people.

    Vital Stats:

    Dog Breed Group:Companion Dogs Height:8 inches to 10 inches tall at the shoulder Weight:Up to 7 pounds Life Span:12 to 15 years

    Highlights

    • Although your Maltese will want to please you, he can be difficult to housetrain. Crate training is recommended.
    • Maltese are prone to chills, especially if they are damp or walking in damp areas.
    • If your Maltese has long hair, he can get sunburned on the skin where the hair is parted on the back.
    • Because of their small size and delicate structure, Maltese generally aren't recommended for households with toddlers or small children.
    • Some Maltese have delicate digestive systems and may be picky eaters. Eating problems can occur if your Maltese has teeth or gum problems as well. If your Maltese is showing discomfort when eating or after eating, take him to the vet for a checkup.
    • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.