Aggressive dog breeds

/Aggressive dog breeds
  • American Pit Bull Terrier

    Rated 4.38 out of 5

    Description

    The American Pit Bull Terrier is a companion and family dog breed. Originally bred to “bait” bulls, the breed evolved into all-around farm dogs, and later moved into the house to become “nanny dogs” because they were so gentle around children. Their tenacity, gameness, and courage make them popular competitors in the sports of weight pulling, agility, and obedience competition.

    Vital Stats:

    Dog Breed Group: Terrier Dogs Height: 1 foot, 5 inches to 1 foot, 7 inches tall at the shoulder Weight: 30 to 85 pounds Life Span: 12 to 16 years

    Highlights

     
    • American Pit Bull Terriers are not a good choice for people who can give them little or no attention.
    • They must be trained and socialized when young to overcome the breed's tendencies toward stubbornness and bossiness, which combined with his strength can make him hard to handle if he hasn't learned you are in charge.
    • Your American Pit Bull Terrier must be kept on leash in public to prevent aggression toward other dogs. It's not a good idea to let these dogs run loose in dog parks. While they might not start a fight, they'll never back down from one, and they fight to the finish. American Pit Bulls who aren't properly socialized as puppies can become aggressive toward other dogs.
    • Breed-specific legislation almost always includes this breed. Be aware of rules in your area as well as neighboring regions if you travel with your dog.
    • American Pit Bull Terriers have a great need to chew, and powerful jaws make quick work of cheap or flimsy toys. Give yours only tough, durable toys that can't be chewed up and swallowed.
    • American Pit Bull Terriers are best suited to owners who can offer firm, fair training, and gentle consistent discipline.
       
  • Bull Terrier

    Rated 5.00 out of 5

    Description

    The Bull Terrier was originally developed in the 19th century as a fighting dog and, later, a fashionable companion for gentlemen, but these days he’s a family companion and show dog. He’s a dog breed distinguished by his long, egg-shaped head.

    Vital Stats:

    Dog Breed Group:Terrier Dogs Height:1 foot, 9 inches to 1 foot, 10 inches tall at the shoulder Weight:35 to 75 pounds Life Span:10 to 15 years

    Highlights

    • Bull Terriers thrive in the company of their people, and should live indoors with their human family. They don't do well when left alone for long periods and will wreak destruction when bored.
    • Bull Terriers aren't suited for cold, damp climates. Keep your Bull Terrier warm with a coat or sweater in winter.
    • These aren't high maintenance dogs, grooming-wise. A weekly brushing and occasional wipe-down with a damp cloth is usually all it takes to keeps them clean, although they must be brushed more frequently during twice-yearly shedding periods.
    • The Bull Terrier needs 30 to 60 minutes of exercise, play, and mental stimulation daily.
    • Ownership of Bull Terriers is restricted or banned in some cities, states, and provinces. Research your local dog laws before you get one; banned dogs may be seized and euthanized.
    • The Bull Terrier is strong-willed and can be difficult to train. He's not recommended for timid or first-time dog owners.
    • Without early socialization and training, Bull Terriers can be aggressive toward other dogs, animals, and people he doesn't know.
    • Bull Terriers are too rough and rambunctious for homes with young children, but they're tireless playmates for active older kids who've been taught how to interact with dogs.
    • Never buy a Bull Terrier from a puppy mill, a pet store, or a breeder who doesn't provide health clearances or guarantees. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies and who breeds for sound temperaments.
  • Doberman Pinscher

    Rated 4.00 out of 5

    Description

    The Doberman Pinscher was developed in Germany during the late 19th century, primarily as a guard dog. His exact ancestry is unknown, but he’s believed to be a mixture of many dog breeds, including the Rottweiler, Black and Tan Terrier, and German Pinscher. With his sleek coat, athletic build, and characteristic cropped ears and docked tail, the Doberman Pinscher looks like an aristocrat. He is a highly energetic and intelligent dog, suited for police and military work, canine sports, and as a family guardian and companion.

    Vital Stats:

    Dog Breed Group:Working Dogs Height:2 feet to 2 feet, 4 inches tall at the shoulder Weight:60 to 80 pounds Life Span:10 to 13 years

    Highlights

    • The Doberman has a great deal of energy and needs a lot of exercise.
    • This breed can be protective, so don't be surprised when he assumes the role of household guardian.
    • The Dobie will assume the alpha role in your household if you're not a strong leader. Early, consistent training is critical to establish your role as pack leader.
    • The Dobie is sensitive to cold weather and needs adequate shelter in winter (he likes to be in the house next to the fireplace).
    • The Doberman Pinscher is a family dog and shouldn't be left alone. He thrives when he's included in family activities.
    • The Doberman has gained a reputation as being vicious. Even though your Doberman may have a sweet personality, neighbors and strangers may be afraid of him.
    • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
  • Rottweiler

    Rated 4.43 out of 5

    Description

    Rottweilers were originally dogs bred to drive cattle to market. Later they were used to pull carts for butchers. They were among the earliest police dogs and serve with honor in the military. Most important, they are popular family guardians and friends.

    Vital Stats:

    Dog Breed Group:Working Dogs Height:1 foot, 10 inches to 2 feet, 3 inches tall at the shoulder Weight:85 to 130 pounds Life Span:8 to 11 years

    Highlights

    • Rottweilers are large, powerful dogs and require extensive socialization and training from early puppyhood.
    • Even if you train and socialize your Rottweiler, expect to be subjected to sometimes unfair advance judgments about your dog, maybe even having untrue allegations made about him and his activities, by those who fear him.
    • Because of the current prejudice against dogs such as Rottweilers and claims that they can be dangerous, you may have to carry extra liability insurance to own one, depending upon the ordinances in your town. In some areas, you may not even be able to own a Rottweiler, or may be forced to give up any that you have.
    • Rottweilers love people and want to be with their families. If they are left alone for long periods of time or don't receive adequate exercise, they may become destructive.
    • If raised with children, well-bred Rottweilers get along fine with them. They must be taught, however, what is acceptable behavior with children. Rotties have a natural instinct to herd and may "bump" children to herd them. Because of their size, this "bump" may cause toddlers to fall down and injure themselves. In addition, some Rottweilers have a strong prey drive and may get overly excited when children run and play. Always supervise your Rottweiler when he's around children.
    • If you have an adult Rottweiler, introduce new animals, especially dogs, carefully. Rottweilers can be aggressive toward strange dogs, particularly those of the same sex. Under your leadership, however, your Rottie will probably learn to coexist peacefully with his new companion.
    • Rottweilers are intelligent and are highly trainable if you're firm and consistent.
    • Rottweilers will test you to see if you really mean what you say. Be specific in what you ask, and don't leave any loopholes for them to exploit.
    • Rottweilers require a couple of 10- to 20-minute walks or playtimes daily.
    • Rottweilers have a double coat and shed heavily in the spring and the fall, moderately throughout the rest of the year.
    • Many Rottweilers snore.
    • If their food intake is not monitored, Rotties have a tendency to overeat and can gain weight.
    • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.